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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 218 (some duplicates have been removed)
the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi® card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts. more events. more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with a citi card. [ crowd cheering, mouse clicks ] >>> voter suppression law has an ugly link to the 2000 voting mess. that's next. a cup of johan is a 600 horsepower sports coupe that likes to hug curves. ♪ your curves. smooth, rich, never bitter, gevalia. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast-
the law because they feel like they are losing is wrong. what? by ensuring that all voters get to cast ballots? why on earth would a republican governor want to decrease early voting? well, it could be because the democrats aren't losing, they're actually kicking butt in early voting. according to an internal obama campaign document today that is exactly the case. here's what that document reveal reveals. in florida over a third of expected voters have already voted. as you can see early voters 50% voting for president obama. obama, 44% for mitt romney. election day that means mitt romney has to get 53% of the vote in florida if he's going to win. so that is a pretty hefty tag to run up. that's all according to the obama campaign. in iowa over a third of voters have already voted there. and among those early voters, you can see 64% of those are supporting barack obama. 35% of them are supporting mitt romney. and that means that mitt romney is going to need to win 59% of election-day voters. in north carolina, nearly half of all ballots have already been cast. and of those who have alr
delegation, six democrats. pennsylvania law speak to the apportioning process. the republican-controlled legislature essentially redrew the congressional boundary lines, moving some seats that were vulnerable in the eastern part of the state, three of them in at the philadelphia suburbs, one of them, one of them in the lehigh valley and one of them up in scranton. basically running the west and south to try to pick up more republicans without getting into the details of it -- karen lives in one of those areas where the boundary lines were redrawn. i do not know which congressman -- that might be in the 15th, with charlie dent. that was the lehigh valley seat. then out comes down to south central pennsylvania. or she could be in a seat held by a republican, lou barletta. that district was redrawn -- that district now comes the whole way down to the state capital, picking up more republicans. here is a way to think about that at the moment -- in competitive terms. nobody believes, independent analysts, nobody believes that of the 18 congressional seats, that more than two of the
our presenting event sponsor, the law firm of hush blackwell, and our media sponsors, ksdk news channel 5, st. louis public radio, and the st. louis business journal. ksdk is televising this broadcast live to its affiliates across missouri. st. louis public radio is affils across missouri. st. louis public radio is doing the same. the broadcasts is also been streamed live on ksdk.com and stlpublicradio.org. we also invite you to take part on social media on twitter. finally, our appreciation to the city police and fire department, as well as the school district of clayton for hosting tonight's event. before we begin, i'd like to review the debate format. each candidate will give a 3- minute opening statement and a 3-minute closing statement. next, our panel will ask questions of both candidates. both candidates will answer the same question and have one and half minute to do so. rebuttals will be at the discretion of the moderator and will have 45 seconds. after that, we will take questions from the audience, who received an index card as they entered the auditorium. they were a
if the court continues down the path of sitting dog sniffs are not searches at all, law enforcement will be completely unfettered to use drug dogs however they wish. that could lead to a random sweeps of neighborhoods where people. limited and only by the restrictions the fourth abutment has on seizures. more broadly, again, as technology develops, if the court continues down the path of sitting there are some searches that, a detect contraband and are not searches at all, the encroachments on our privacy are going to increase ever further as technology moves on. >> i was a little puzzled as to what the florida supreme court really meant -- really wanted in the harris case. it is not just enough to say the dog has been certified, you need more performance evidence. how would that work? every time there is a case where drug evidence is used, the prosecution would have to come and and a show, what, there is some sort of test? he has gone out 100 times -- what would be the evidence that would be enough to convince a judge this dog was reliable? what's the traditional test for probable
beloved cousin and in law. prayers as you move through this season of sorrow. and of grief. thank you for sharing george breathes with you. profoundly george stanley mcgovern as a son an example of our heritage, i each of you for coming celebrate and honor senator mcgovern's life and witness. to share the mcgovern family's brief. to political colleague, a trusted mentor -- [no audio] and prairie form them to embrace common person and to tirelessly worked for the common good. george mcgovern was also a prairie prophet. he called and inspired an generation to do justice, to love mercy and to walk with our god. he focused the world's on the plight of the hungry. fought for peace. he called on us to repent a misguided, wasteful, and selfish to seeking and speaking the truth. articulate it in his hometown to and not in nazareth to preach the good news to the poor, to be prisoners, to give sight to the blind and to proclaim the year of the lord's savior. we can learn much from jesus' experience in bringing good to the poor and liberating the oppressed. of teaching and preaching in galilee.
many states that were trying to do a voter suppression with the idea laws, now we have won the most of that. now we have to be careful that the accurate count is given. everybody in the campaign has to be ready for recounting. if it goes to the supreme court, but we have to go there. host: are you still there? caller: it must be fair. host: from our twitter page -- steve is joining us from virginia on the republican line. caller: there is no such thing as a voter suppression, that is just silly. there is a voter fraud as was revealed by james keene where he recorded the son of jim moran telling somebody how to commit of voter fraud. there are lots of dead people that are registered. that was the purpose of this to get the dead people off of the voter rolls. the process is going forward in virginia. everybody who registers in virginia gets a voter i.d.. it is a responsibility. a lot of people did not want to have anything to do with responsibility. host: thank you for the call. eight romney ryan white house, it could happen. -- a romney-biden white house, it could happen. the magic n
wall street." he is now a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the new york university school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i thini was 12 years old.12 so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't rlly even know what ll that was until i actually got at the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going
, and we need to think about the risks they may post to other people. and lastly under current law before turn to part about health reform, i just would be remiss if i didn't point out in terms of access that there are some eligibility gaps in the snap. now be for some legal immigrants and unemployed childless adults who face a three-month time in a three month time limit has been suspended in most parts of the country during the recession. but basically if you don't have shown and you're between 18-29 you can only get food stamps, snap for three months. over a three-year period. if you're not working. and so that time limit will be coming back in the coming years and is really a serious weakness in the program. and we can talk, if people want to comment about what some of the other changes that are legislative the under consideration in coming, in congress right now. if folks want to go there but i'm going to skip that. most of what i want to talk about, looking forward to the next few years, what is the future of the snap access, and we were think as i said, about packaging step with ot
party, the republican party is not a choice on the ballot. with the voter i.d. law, all they want to do is disenfranchise the voter. okay? the republican party but the libertarian party through hell, to be honest with you. just to get 1% of the boat off the ballot. -- of the vote off. the libertarian party never got more than 1% of the votes nationally and i think it's ridiculous. i have volunteered for the libertarian party. they were arguing over signatures. what a waste of time and taxpayers' money because that had to all go in to the courts. host: terry madonna, third parties and the pennsylvania ballot. guest: gary johnson will be on the ballot house will -- as will jill stein of the green party. pennsylvania can write someone in. we will essentially have four two choices. host: the headline this morning from "the philadelphia inquirer ." joining us is the politics writer from "the enquirer." thank you for being with us. share with us these polling numbers. how many did you survey and what are the results? caller: it was a survey of 600 likely voters all last week, tuesday through
to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't really even know what that was until i actually got the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going to take on this job at this -- in the depth of this crisis?" >> part of it was because this new office, this office of the specl inspector general for tarp, with the worst acronym in washington. >> it really is. >> sigtarp, was to have two focuses. one was the oversight function and doing reports and audits and keeping an eye on treasury and making recommendations. but what i was more focused on in the beginning and what i thought my job would be is we also created a brand-new law enforcement agency, completely from scratch, whose job was to police the tarp program. and with $700 billion going out the door, the idea was that, inevitably, there were going to be criminal flies drawn to that honey. and our job was to catch them, do thinveig
reproduction. it's about the economy, that it's about race. when we think about jim crow laws, it was all about not allowing people of two different races to reproduce. i hadn't quite put it all together until i heard you say that, so i don't want other folks to misses that. and yet surprisingly the gender gap is less extreme than i might think it would be given these circumstances. is it -- when i look at the numbers, it says to me, yes, there's a gender gap, but it's still being driven primarily by women of color and by young women. so what's going on not just with the extremes of the republican party, but with women who hear this and i'm like, yeah, i'm town with them. what is that some. >> the conventional wisdom is when the republicans say these extreme things, those women will be turned off and vote if democrats. i don't think that's necessarily the case. it's not that they don't reject what is being said, because they do. but at the same time sometimes if you're independent and you are dead on the in middle, it's because you're turned off by booth pa both party. so democrats have to reme
, corporations, unions, other associations, not permitted to make contributions. that has been the law for more than 40 years. they are allowed to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to put cannot make such a patient. typically, presidential candidates raise money at the maximum level, they are well known nationally, lots of wealthy individuals and groups that want to support them. the obama campaign stands out in that respect of it. it is also importantthan 40 yea. they are allowed to spend their own to note, the caller is making another race has been more focused in many respects on a small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money, about 60% of the outside money, has been raised from about 200 individuals. the number of people you could fit on an airplane have respecta small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money
that is an important thing to remember. i have a budget of law at -- a little more than $1 million, which is a lot three-person like me. a cultural institution for an impact with the entire city -- that is not a -- not that much. museums are run on a higher budget. university colleges, professors in universities are on a bigger budget. the point is that if we want to solve this and realize we want to have more coverage, there are ways to do that. we have setup a society that knows how to find institutions with that kind of impact. the "texas tribune," we inspired them -- now they inspire us with their ideas and structure. >> they are treated from people from a "texas monthly magazine" wanted to focus on local politics? >> we were featured on the front page of the "new york times" after investigations we did. they told us, what can we do here? they decided they wanted to do an entity in austen that covers politics relevant to the entire state. now they're running on a $5 million budget. we are all talking at that. that is a lot of money for the -- not a lot of money for the type of impact that inst
. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ with such power, [ rumbling, crowd screaming ] the results could be felt around the world. twice the stain fighting power as the leading liquid value brand. era detergent. a lot of fight for a little dough. ee . >>> if the romney campaigns ends, lower standard even by the romney campaign. what mitt romney is doing with the story on jobs in ohio is something new. here's how it started in ohio last week. >> i saw a story today, that one of the great manufacturers in this state, jeep, now owned by the italians, is thinking of moving all production to china. >> romney immediately got called out by that by conservative newspaper that endorsed him and by jeep's parent company, calling the statement a leap that would be difficult even for professional circus acrobats. but -- well, maybe he didn't see those fact-checks. why else would he put out this ad? >> obama took gm and chrysler into bankruptcy and sold chrysler to italians who a
, not that he-- the problem isn't that he violated the first law of the fetus club which is don't talk about fetus club, like that's not-- because it's the idea. i mean where does mourdock get his crazy fringe ideas about rape and abortion anyway? i done know, maybe from mitt romney's running mate, paul ryan who cosponsored a sanctity of human life act so severe it not only could outlaw all abortions but also could effectively ban in-vitro fertilization or the platform of the republican party-- calls for a human life amendment to the constitution. nothing in there about exceptions for rape, incest, life of the mother or feelings of swing voters. in other words, accord together republican party platform, and the man who wants to be a heartbeat away from a presidency, if a woman wants to have a baby, in-vitro fertilization, she cannot. rape, she has to. no wonder they buried it on page 14, rather than than splashing it across the cover. we'll be right back. (cheers and applause) >> jon: my guest tonight is the house democratic minority leader and served california's 8th district. please welcom
law obeyed in the second they saw was a rental car and a young kid, they pulled me over right away. he was the first time that a group the pattern that they looked for. and now of course they look for anything because the drug trade has become so profitable and lucrative. it's a $30 billion trade that anyone using anything, grandparents using rvs come to people in there as fishing boats and they go to the lake, doing anything because profits are enormous. so the cops are aware to look for that now. >> hipolito, how about your mexican background in relation to being able to infiltrate these groups? >> it was extremely important and yet i have to understand is that as soon as kind of thing that my spanish might not have been what it was from someone in mexico or central america when i was working on the cartels. the thing that it was brought out is the criminal element is not limited to hispanic american, but i was able to use my background again where i grew up, and seen some of the things that i grew up, so i was able to capitalize on my background, infiltrating. but what is important,
on shore about 30 miles from rehoboth to, in new jersey. my state, where my in-laws used to live, where my brothers and sisters live, they were hit pretty badly. i have a sister in law and family who live in ocean city, new jersey. you saw how badly they were hit. it is kind of amazing -- it is kind of amazing. a call yesterday with all the governors and mayors, it warmed my heart. you had the governor of delaware, the governor of connecticut, the governor of pennsylvania, democrats and republicans, and they were hurt. the governor of maryland. all saying to new jersey and new york -- look, if you need extra resources, we will send you ours. we will send you hours. listen on the telephone, hearing the mayor of the big city, not only mayor bloomberg, who is one hell of a fine guy, mayor bloomberg of new york. mayor booker of newark, hoboken -- hear these guys talking, they are all offering each other help. offering each other help. democrats and republicans, acting like democrats and republicans are supposed to act. [applause] ladies and gentlemen. we are always, i know this sounds almost t
the health care law that will pay primary care physicians more money. >> stephanie: right. that's what i'm saying people want to blame obama for everything. it becomes a punch line. >> and if you tell them it is untrue they say no, no no no. and go on. >> stephanie: yes. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: mitt romney took his claim that president obama has stolen $716 million from medicare, do the next level, seniors mostly likely will be unable to see specialists because of obamacare. >> did you see the one too i think in virginia where he say there was a barbecue place that went out of business and blamed it on obama. and it turns out they had a lot of health care violations -- >> they were washing their hands in poop. >> yeah. and he is attacking gas prices there are videos in the kiosks so it's really throw anything at the wall and see what sticks -- >> that smacks of desperation. >> it does. >> stephanie: on the doctor front, as we know mitt romney's staff has said they are not going toet let their campaign be dictated by fact checkers. he said i
finance laws in the country. we went out there to see what kind of effect all this outside money that's coming in. it's not just in the senate race. it's in down ballot races, local races, state, congressional and state legislative races. that's why you go out there. you discover real quick the people in montana don't want outside money. they don't want people telling them what to do. they don't want outside groups independently influencing campaigns. they just want people to leave them alone and let them make up their own minds, you know? >> what is fascinating to me about what's happening in montana is here you had a state, here you had law makers trying to do something about campaign finance reform and now you've got all these groups that managed to find ways around it. >> in 1912 the state of montana passed the corrupt passages act, the strictest finance campaign reform in the country. it was brought as a challenges to citizens united. supreme court had a second look via this montana case and said we are going to stay with citizens united. we think there is no corruption if there
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
rate of any country in the world. 2.3 million people. half of what we spend on law enforcement, the court and the prisons is drug related, and to what end. look, this is not about advocating drug use. 50% of kids graduating from high school have smoked marijuana. that's an issue that belongs with families, not in the criminal justice system. [applause] >> anybody have any rebuttal? >> i have to make my statements first, and then my rebuttal. so as a medical doctor previously in clinical practice for about 25 years, i can say with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to o
-thinking immigration policy. >> around the world waiting to come to this country and willing to respect our laws. i support legal immigration. i think we need changes to our immigration laws so that immigration is based more on talent and hard work and ability and skill so we have a pro-america immigration policy. with respect to children who are brocket here by their parents at the young age, i think we need a solution to the problem. congressman asked me last week if i had been in the house would i have voted. yes is the answer. the bill never made it through the senate. we need bipartisanship approaches i look forwarding with working with marco ruin ya to make sure a loss passes not that a single faction can pass something to the house. that's the difference between the house and the senate. the priority when i was there to secure the border. that's opened up opportunities to reform our immigration system. heinrich: wush of one of the thing things things is border patrol agencies to the board and hundreds of new custom about. that doesn't fix the underlying issue. we have proactive community. th
? they passed a law to change the system. we say, here are the people who qualify and the yget the loans at a lower interest rate. every student in the country who gets one of these loans will have the right to pay it back as a low, fixed percent of their income for 20 years. now, think about this. what that means is, nobody ever has to drop out of college because theyr'e scared of b orrowing more money. if you get out and want to teach in a small town in rural ohio -- you can do it anyway. what you have to pay will be determined by what you're making. not the other way around. and believe it or not, here's the kicker. this, over 10 years, costs you $60 billion less than the old system. so -- the president and the congress allocated that to increasing pell grands every year for a decade and to maintaining the tuition tax credit to pay the way through college. this is unbelievable. now, here's what you need to know. even the more moderate immage of governor romney cannot obscure the fact he has committed to repealing that law. he wants to give -- i'm telling you. idiology over evidence. t
of issues with law enforcement, particularly the issue of creating a funnel for narcotics trafficking within 5 miles of the new mexico border. there are hundreds of new mexicans who have signed petitions that saying, please do not do this. you are ignoring them. you are not going to find a solution that way. >> let's move on to the next question. >> in 2007, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators reached a tentative compromise on immigration reform. but even with president bush's support, the compromise collapsed. most agree we need immigration reform. what reforms do yoou support? and how would you get the senate to approve immigration reform when such a bipartisan group could not? representative wilson. >> it is separate from border security. the united states has to have effective control of our borders. the number of people crossing the border illegally has gone down because of the resources that we put in there since 2005. that is a good thing. the people who are still crossing tend to be heavily armed narco traffickers and human traffickers. it's very dangerous. with respect to immigratio
a yes in washington state, a yes in maine will make marriage equality the law of the land. >> in those three states. >> bill: right. in minnesota a yes would put it in the constitution banning it. >> right. >> bill: so we want a yes vote in maryland, maine, and washington, and a no vote in minnesota. >> right. the polling vote looks positive in all of the forward-leaning states. maine, maryland, and washington. it looks possible in every one of those states -- and as i mentioned last time the caveat is people don't want to tell pollsters on the phone that they are against marriage equality. >> bill: uh-huh. >> but i think we're poised to win maybe one of these -- at least one of these, and potentially more, and it would be historic just to win one. >> bill: yeah. has president obama helped the movement? >> yeah, there's no doubt in my mind that him coming out in support of same-sex marriage on may 9th of this year, made a huge difference. at that point people have to grapple with, wait a second this guy wasn't for it -- well he was for it, then he wasn't for it a
of the roadness has been extraordinary. >> right. >> you're right. a big law on health care and not much else. but that was a big thing. >> jonathan chaits, i'm going to echo him but not quote from him. if you look on facebook, jonathan endorsed an argument really took off. i think that's partly because people who do lean one way or in a place now where they're paying attention and want to hear the right argument. i dodge think mayor bloomberg is going to persuade a lot of people in the close here, but for people leaning towards obama it is mobilizing. that is really the point at this phase in an election. i mean we talked about jay-z being on obama's side and to quote jay-z, we are in a love me or leave me alone moment in a mobilizing phase. >> do you think we're in that moment or did you just want to drop jay-z? >> i really do. what i mean is, i really don't believe endorsements, "new york times" endorsed barack obama, i don't think that people are waking up in the morning reading that and going now i'm going to vote. but i do think -- >> given -- >> wait. but just to finish the point i don
saturday night. make no mistake, democrats have been fighting successfully against unfair voter i.d. laws and purged lists. but the threat remains, some voting advocates expect a record number of voter challenges. the best advice, vote anyway. don't get bullied at the polls, and don't give up. i'm joined tonight by ohio state senator nina turner, also with us tonight is judith brown dianis, the co-director of the advancement project. judith, let me ask you first, what is the biggest threat at the polls as you see it right now? >> sure. well, thanks for having me, ed. we have moved from politicians who have tried to manipulate the laws to restrict the vote to now these partisan operatives. you know, in ohio you have husted, the secretary of state, who has been on a relentless effort to restrict the vote, who now admits there has been a glitch in the computer system. 33,000 people who registered have not found themselves on the rolls and cannot get their absentee ballots. it is a glitch. then you have true the vote, organizations that say that they're about election integrity who are prepar
anything. that is the law of the state of ohio. i am the administer of the law. we have strict laws in regarding this. i have some latitude in setting uniform hours. but what we really like is the more people that vote early, the fewer people show up on election day and that means we have shorterlines at the polls because most people have already cast their ballots. or at least a lot of them. >> a lot of them, yeah. 1.3 million absentee ballots were requested. that's an issue because of the provisional ballots. if the people who said yes, i do want an absentee ballot don't turn it in and go to the polls and vote, then they'll have to do a provisional ballot. >> well, first of all, we want voters who requested their ballot to turn them in. we encourage them to do that. right now, we're at 8 pe85 perc of them have returned. and we think that the number could actually be smaller than it was the last time. so we're not concerned about that. >> we are because we're here and you can't count those ballots or those votes until november 17th. i'm joking, but the whole country could be waitin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 218 (some duplicates have been removed)